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Mine Safety Labeling
  • Mine safety labeling introduction
  • Mine accident prevention
  • Mine incident reduction
  • What is the MSHA?
  • Does the MSHA require labeling?
  • MSHA and SafetyPro


  • Mine safety labeling Introduction   mine safety intro

    Safety practices in mining have changed dramatically through the centuries. What used to be a deadly occupation is becoming increasingly safer through regulation and implementation of safety plans and procedures. Governments around the globe are more aware of the risks, hazards and problems associated with mine safety than ever before.

    One area of mine safety that is growing rapidly is visual awareness through signs and labels. Proper labeling of hazards is critical to the safety of miners and workers, both above and below the surface. Through proper labeling, workers are made aware of risks before they are exposed to the hazard, and are more likely to prepare and protect themselves and others. The Safety Pro brings mine safety to a new level by introducing on-site, on-the-spot safety labeling to the mining industry.

    Mine accident prevention   mine accident prevention

    The MSHA provides a resource for miners to share safety tips and information for accident prevention. These tips come directly from miners, and those with experience in the mining industry. Sharing information is absolutely essential to safety and prevention, because it empowers the experienced worker with a voice and with authority. As awareness grows and more ideas are shared, mine workers will be able to learn, understand and implement increased safety procedures without having to go through the experience of learning through accidents and failures themselves.

    Mine incident reduction   mine incident reduction

    The Mine Incident Reduction Program is a program offered by the MSHA AED. It is described on the MSHA website as follows:

    The Incident Reduction (IR) Program offered by MSHA Technical Support, Applied Engineering Division (AED) began in late 2002 to assist in the reduction of mining accidents. The program is voluntary i.e. the operator asks the district for assistance and in turn, the district requests AED assistance. The effort begins with an initial meeting with the district, mine operator and AED; at this meeting AED explains the process and the operator decides to request the program or not. The effort is a one year program and consists of interviews with employees, consultation with the district and the operator's managers, review of statistics and accidents, review of the mine's safety culture and program, observance of work habits and mining process, and a written report of findings and recommendations by AED. Quarterly follow-up continues during the annual effort and consists of visits and quarterly update reports of company response/action to the initial report. To date, over 20 coal mines, preparation plants or contractors have received assistance as part of this program with average results being a 60 percent reduction in the NFDL rate for the participating mines by the end of the year long effort.
    You can read more about the program and other considerations at the MSHA website.

    What is the MSHA?   what is MSHA

    MSHA stands for "Mine Safety and Health Administration." The stated mission of the organization is "to prevent death, disease, and injury from mining and to promote safe and healthful workplaces for the Nation's miners." Most importantly, the MSHA provides a framework for safety improvement in processes and procedures. Change is difficult, especially in an industry with such a long history; but even so, change for the sake of safety and protection of human life, is worth the trouble.

    The greatest area of change, and perhaps one of the greatest challenges for the MSHA, is in the area of visual awareness. Safety processes and procedures are only worthwhile if they are effectively communicated at every level. That means the managers and executives in the meeting making safety decisions MUST be able to communicate those decisions to every level of worker. Visual awareness through signs and labels is the easiest way to ensure proper communication of safety related information.

    Does the MSHA require labeling?   MSHA safety labeling and signs

    The MSHA itself requires labeling only in the framework of safety processes developed by individual companies. Other organizations, such as OSHA, also regulate and require safety labeling. Safety Pro by ISS provides systems, software and supplies to help any organization meet and exceed governmental safety labeling requirements. By using Safety Pro labeling systems, organizations will be able to approach MSHA related efforts with a broader perspective that ties OSHA and other compliance standards together, for a more practical and effective mine safety plan.

    MSHA and SafetyPro   MSHA Safety Pro

    The SafetyPro is an industrial label and sign making machine designed for heavy use in any environment. It is portable, and can be connected to any PC or network to produce safety labels and signs instantly, where and when you need them. The Safety Pro has a full range of supplies for mine safety, such as phosphorescent labeling tape, high-visibility color ranges, and reflective labeling material. Only Safety Pro provides the power you need to bring effective labeling to your MSHA compliance efforts.